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Institute for Law and the Humanities Announcement Archive

November 4, 2009 at 3:00:

The Institute for Law and the Humanities hosted nationally known Nazi Holocaust scholar Harry Reicher, who is Scholar in Residence at Touro Law School and Adjunct Professor at University of Pennsylvania Law School.

In this photo, left to right: Distinguished Prof. Sheldon Nahmod, Prof. Harry Reicher, and Prof. Felice BatlanThe title of his presentation was The Nazi Obsession with Legalizing the Holocaust. Here is his description:

The Nazi Holocaust represented the ultimate in sheer, brutal lawlessness. Yet the Nazi regime in Germany went to extraordinary lengths to legalize what it was doing, thereby creating the ultimate oxymoron, pseudo-legal terror. This presentation will examine the perversion of the country's legal system, in both its legislative and judicial aspects, and the conversion of both into savage instruments designed to discriminate against, ostracize, dehumanize, and ultimately eliminate certain classes of people, Jews first and foremost. This is a little-known dimension of the Holocaust, one that added another weapon to the armory trained by the Nazis against their victims, and that prompted the court in the trial of the Nazi lawyers and judges at Nuremberg to summarize, very powerfully: "The dagger of the assassin was concealed beneath the robe of the jurist."

October 2, 2009

Architectual history tour of IIT's Main Campus with a renowned architectual historian and scholar. Come learn about why IIT's campus is world famous. Reception with students and faculty from the Architecture school will follow the tour. Details on transportation to follow. (Co-sponsored by the Architectual School and the Faculty-Student Activities Committee).

April 7, 2009

It's now official. The renowned Lincoln Trio, under the auspices of the Ravinia Festival, is coming to Kent on Tuesday evening, April 7, 2009, to perform an historic chamber music program in celebration of the Lincoln bicentennial. This special program of the Institute for Law and the Humanities, which is also co-sponsored by Alumni Relations and Development, will take place in the auditorium from 6:30-8:30 pm, with a reception from 5:30-6:30 in the lobby. All faculty, students, alumni, staff and their guests are cordially invited.

November 19, 2008

"Wet With Blood": in co-operation with the Chicago History Museum (CHM), a program on Lincoln's DNA that highlights presentations by Professor Lori Andrews and Russell Lewis, Executive Vice-President and Chief Historian of CHM.

October 7, 2008

James Cuno (center), president and director of the Art Institute of Chicago

At Chicago-Kent College of Law: James Cuno, President and Director of the Art Institute of Chicago, speaking on Cultural Property.

October 2, 2008

At the American Bar Foundation: Conference on Comparative Medieval Law

February 13, 2008 - Speaker: Prof. Paul Finkelman

3:00pm - 4:00pm
Event Room

Distinguished Professor Paul Finkelman of Albany Law SchoolPaul Finkelman is President William McKinley Distinguished Professor of Law and Public Policy and Senior Fellow, Government Law Center at Albany Law School. A specialist in American legal history, race and the law Paul Finkelman is the author of more than 100 scholarly articles and more than twenty books. He is an expert in areas such as the law of slavery, constitutional law, and legal issues surrounding baseball. He was a Fellow in Law and the Humanities at Harvard Law School and received his Ph.D. and M.A. from the University of Chicago.

February 27, 2008 - A talk by Gary Johnson

3:00pm - 4:00pm
Event Room

Gary T. Johnson, president of the Chicago History MuseumGary T. Johnson was named the eighth President of the Chicago History Museum in August 2005. Mr. Johnson came to the Museum after 28 years as a lawyer and partner in the Chicago offices of two global law firms, Mayer Brown and Jones Day. He has a record of leadership in the civic arena, particularly in civil rights and legal services to the poor. From 2001-03, he was co-chair of the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights, and continues to serve on its executive committee.

Sponsored by the Jewish Studies Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and by the Institute for Law and the Humanities Chicago-Kent College of Law:

 

The University of Illinois at Chicago and Chicago-Kent College of Law are proud to announce a new initiative in Jewish/Muslim relations. Please join us for two public lectures inaugurating the initiative by Dr. Akbar Ahmed, former high commissioner from Pakistan to the United Kingdom and the Ibn Khaldun Chair of Islamic Studies at American University.

The Importance of Jewish/Muslim Dialogue: Crossroad for the Abrahamic Faiths
The Importance of Jewish/Muslim Dialogue: Judaism and Knowledge in the Abrahamic Faiths
Monday, November 28, 2005

4:00 pm

University of Illinois at Chicago
Room 302
Student Center East
750 South Halsted

Reception to follow
in Room 605
Tuesday, November 29, 2005

12:00 pm

Chicago-Kent College of Law,
Illinois Institute of Technology
Ogilvie Auditorium
565 West Adams

Reception to follow
in the lobby
Both lectures are free and open to the public. Please RSVP by November 19, 2005 to (312) 413-2500. Persons who may require assistance or who have questions should contact (312) 413-2102.


Friday, September 16

Martin Marty, Professor Emeritus of the University of Chicago Divinity School and internationally known scholar on fundamentalism, will speak on Fundamentalist Religion and Democracy on Friday, September 16, at 2 pm in the Event Room at Chicago-Kent. The talk is free and open to all. There will be a reception following the presentation.

Professor Marty's talk is part of series on law and religion sponsored in 2005-2006 by the Institute for Law and the Humanities.

Wednesday, September 28

The Chicago-Kent Chapter of the American Constitution Society and the Institute for Law and Humanities are pleased to announce a talk by the Hon. Abner J. Mikva, on Wednesday, September 28, at 3pm in the Event Room. Judge Mikva is currently director of the Mandel Legal Aid Clinic at the University of Chicago Law School. He has served as a member of the House of Representatives, as Chief Judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, and as White House Counsel to President Clinton. He will speak on the subject of "The War Power and the Constitution: A View from Three Branches."

The event is free and open to all. There will be a reception following the presentation.

Please save the date for what promises to be a provocative and timely presentation.

November 18-19, 2005

Popular Constitutionalism:

A symposium on The People Themselves: Popular Constitutionalism and Judicial Review

by Larry D. Kramer

Chicago-Kent College of Law

November 18-19, 2005

This symposium, sponsored by the Chicago-Kent Law Review, the Institute for Law and Humanities at Chicago-Kent College of Law, the Stanford Law Society of Chicago, and the Center for New Deal Studies at Roosevelt University, will bring together legal historians and constitutional scholars to discuss new perspectives on the history and theory of constitutional interpretation. The conference will be framed by consideration of Dean Larry Kramer's book and will consider the rise of judicial power in the United States and alternative ideas of the place of the Constitution in law, politics, and American culture. The Symposium is free, but space is limited.

May 2005

Chicago-Kent Institute for Law and the Humanities Paper Prize

The Chicago-Kent Institute for Law and the Humanities is pleased to announce a new student paper prize. An award of $500.00 will be presented to the best law and humanities paper in 2004-2005. J.D. as well as LL.M. Chicago-Kent students are eligible for the prize. There will be an honorable-mention prize of $250.00.

A law and humanities paper is one that examines any issue from both a legal and a humanities-based perspective, or integrates the two perspectives in an appropriate manner, including legal philosophy, legal history, law and literature and law and religion. The paper must be scholarly and of publishable quality.

Eligibility and Submission: The prize is limited to Chicago-Kent students enrolled in the 2004-2005 year. Submissions must have been written in association with a course or an independent research project in either the Fall 2004 term or the Spring 2005 term. Submissions are to be sent to Professor Sheldon Nahmod and are to be received no later than June 1, 2005.

Chicago-Kent Institute for Law and the Humanities

Paper Prize

The Chicago-Kent Institute for Law and the Humanities is pleased to announce its second annual student paper prize. An award of $500.00 will be presented to the best law and humanities paper in 2005-2006. J.D. as well as LL.M. Chicago-Kent students are eligible for the prize. There will be an honorable-mention prize of $250.00.

A law and humanities paper is one that examines any issue from both a legal and a humanities-based perspective, or integrates the two perspectives in an appropriate manner, including legal philosophy, legal history, law and literature and law and religion. The paper must be scholarly and of publishable quality.

Eligibility and Submission: The prize is limited to Chicago-Kent students enrolled in the 2005-2006 year. Submissions must have been written in association with a course or an independent research project in either the Fall 2005 term or the Spring 2006 term. Submissions are to be sent to Professor Sheldon Nahmod and are to be received no later than June 1, 2006.