2011 SCIPR Speakers

Thursday, September 15, 2011

 

The Honorable Kathleen M. O'Malley

The Honorable Kathleen M. O'MalleyJudge O'Malley received her A.B. from Kenyon College in 1979 and her J.D. from Case Western Reserve University School of Law in 1982. Upon graduation, she clerked for Judge Nathanial Jones of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit before entering private practice. In 1991, she served as Chief Counsel at the Ohio State Attorney General's Office and then Chief of Staff and First Assistant. Judge O'Malley was appointed to the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Ohio in 1994 and served there until her appointment to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit at the end of 2010, where she now serves.

 

The Honorable James F. Holderman

The Honorable James F. HoldermanChief Judge Holderman received his B.S. from the University of Illinois in 1968 and his J.D. from the University of Illinois College of Law in 1971, after which he clerked for Judge Edward J. McManus of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Iowa. From 1972 to 1978, he was an Assistant U.S. Attorney in Chicago and then entered private practice as a litigator until his appointment to the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois in 1985. He has served as Chief Judge of the court since 2006. In addition to his role on the bench, Chief Judge Holderman has taught at various law schools, including the John Marshall Law School and the University of Illinois College of Law, where he currently teaches.

 

The Honorable David Kappos

The Honorable David KapposDavid Kappos is the Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and Director of the United States Patent and Trademark Office. In this role since August 2009, he advises the President, the Secretary of Commerce, and the Administration on intellectual property matters. Before joining the USPTO, Mr. Kappos served as Vice President and Assistant General Counsel for Intellectual Property at IBM where he managed worldwide intellectual property operations. He has served on numerous boards and other leadership roles in the intellectual property field and has written and spoken widely on intellectual property topics both in the U.S. and globally. Mr. Kappos received his Bachelor of Science degree in electrical and computer engineering from the University of California–Davis in 1983, his law degree from the University of California Berkeley in 1990, and has over 23 years of experience in the intellectual property field.

 

R. (Ted) Edward Cruz

R. (Ted) Edward CruzMr. Cruz received his A.B. from Princeton University in 1992 and his J.D. from Harvard Law School in 1995. After leaving law school, he clerked for Judge J. Michael Luttig of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit and for Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist of the U.S. Supreme Court. During his career Mr. Cruz has served as Associate Deputy Attorney General at the U.S. Department of Justice, the Department of Justice Coordinator for the Bush Transition Team, as Director of the Office of Policy and Planning for the Federal Trade Commission, and as the Solicitor General of Texas. His current practice focuses on appellate advocacy before the U.S. Supreme Court and state and federal appellate courts across the nation. He has authored more than 80 U.S. Supreme Court briefs and has argued nine times before the Court, including in Global-Tech Appliances, Inc.v. SEB S.A., argued in February, where he represented SEB. Presently, Mr. Cruz is a partner at Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP and leads the firm's U.S. Supreme Court and Appellate Litigation Practice.

 

Professor Rochelle C. Dreyfuss

Professor Rochelle C. DreyfussRochelle C. Dreyfuss is the Pauline Newman Professor of Law at New York University School of Law and Co-director of the Engelberg Center on Innovation Law and Policy at NYU. Her research interests include international and domestic intellectual property law. She holds B.A. and M.S. degrees in Chemistry and was a research chemist before entering Columbia University School of Law, where she served as Articles and Book Review Editor of the Law Review. She was a law clerk to Chief Judge Wilfred Feinberg of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and to Chief Justice Warren E. Burger of the U.S. Supreme Court. She is a member of the American Law Institute and was a co-Reporter for its Project on Intellectual Property: Principles Governing Jurisdiction, Choice of Law, and Judgments in Transnational Disputes. She was a consultant to the Federal Courts Study Committee, to the Presidential Commission on Catastrophic Nuclear Accidents, and to the Federal Trade Commission and served on the Secretary of Health and Human Services' Advisory Committee on Genetics Health and Society [SACGHS]. She is a past chair of the Intellectual Property Committee of the American Association of Law Schools. She was also a member of the National Academies committee on Intellectual Property in Genomic and Protein Research and Innovation as well as the committee on Intellectual Property Rights in the Knowledge-Based Economy. She is presently serving on the Academies' Committee on Science, Technology, and Law.

 

David C. Frederick

David C. FrederickMr. Frederick received his B.A. from the University of Pittsburgh in 1983, his D.Phil. from Oxford University in 1987 and his J.D. from the University of Texas School of Law in 1989. Following his graduation from law school, he clerked for Judge Joseph T. Sneed of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and then Justice Byron R. White of the U.S. Supreme Court. He later served as Counselor to the Inspector General of the U.S. Department of Justice and then as Assistant to the Solicitor General. Mr. Frederick's practice focuses primarily on appellate advocacy, and he has argued more than 50 appeals, including 30 in the Supreme Court and in every U.S. Court of Appeals. Most recently, he represented the State of Vermont in Sorrell v. IMS Health Inc., argued before the U.S. Supreme Court in April. In addition to his practice, Mr. Frederick has written widely on a number of legal issues, including three books. At present, Mr. Frederick is a partner of the Washington, D.C., firm of Kellogg, Huber, Hansen, Todd, Evans & Figel PLLC.

 

Seth D. Greenstein

Seth D. GreensteinMr. Greenstein received his B.A. from the University of Maryland, Baltimore in 1981 and his J.D. from Antioch School of Law in 1984. His practice focuses on intellectual property litigation and licensing issues. He has been involved in litigation at both the trial and appellate level. He has also prepared a number of amicus briefs for the U.S. Supreme Court, including briefs in Global-Tech v. SEB and Costco v. Omega during the Court's 2010 term. In addition to litigation, Mr. Greenstein's practice also includes advice and advocacy on legislative and policy issues concerning intellectual property. In 1998, he co-founded and, through 2005, served as counsel to the Digital Media Association, a trade association representing the interests of technology companies involved in the protection and delivery of copyrighted works through digital media. He also participated in committee meetings of experts of the World Intellectual Property Organization from 1990 to 2006 that addressed a number of IP related issues. Beyond these activities, Mr. Greenstein has published numerous articles and is a frequent speaker on issues involving copyright and new technology. Currently, Mr. Greenstein is a partner at the Washington, D.C., office of Constantine Cannon LLP.

 

Professor Mark A. Lemley

Mark LemleyProfessor Lemley received his B.A. from Stanford University in 1988 and his J.D. from University of California, Berkeley School of Law in 1991. After graduating from law school, he clerked for Judge Dorothy Nelson of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. Professor Lemley is currently the William H. Neukom Professor of Law at Stanford Law School and the Director of Stanford's Programs in Law, Science and Technology. Professor Lemley has also held professorships at the University of Texas Law School and the Boalt Hall School of Law. He is a prolific author, having written seven books and 111 articles on intellectual property law and related subjects. He has also testified numerous times before legislative and executive bodies at both the federal and state level and has filed numerous amicus briefs before the U.S. Supreme Court and other courts of appeals. In addition to his scholarship and teaching, Professor Lemley has maintained an active practice of representing clients in all areas of intellectual property, antitrust and Internet law. He has worked at a number of different firms in California and is a founding partner of Durie Tangri LLP, where he currently practices.

 

Professor Edward Lee

Professor Edward LeeProfessor Lee received his B.A. in 1992 from Williams College and his J.D. in 1995 from Harvard Law School, after which he clerked for the Honorable John T. Noonan Jr. of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. He then practiced as an associate at Mayer, Brown & Platt, working at all levels of trial and appellate litigation, including developing the case Golan v. Holder to be argued before the U.S. Supreme Court in its 2011 term. Before joining the Chicago Kent faculty in 2010 as the new Director of the Program in IP Law, he taught at Stanford Law School and at The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law. Professor Lee's scholarship focuses on how the Internet, technological development, and globalization challenge existing legal paradigms. He also writes extensively about the Free Press Clause as a limit on the Copyright Clause.

 

Aaron M. Panner

Aaron PannerMr. Panner received his B.S. from Yale University in 1986 and his J.D. from Harvard Law School in 1995. Between degrees, he worked as a Foreign Service Officer for the U.S. Department of State. Following graduation he clerked for Judge Michael Boudin of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit and then Justice Stephen Breyer of the U.S. Supreme Court. Mr. Panner specializes in antitrust law, intellectual property, and appellate and Supreme Court litigation. Specifically, he has argued two cases before the U.S. Supreme Court and has been involved in a number of other cases brought before the Court. Most recently, he argued in Costco Wholesale Corp. v. Omega, S.A., where he represented Omega. In addition to his practice, Mr. Panner is a Senior Editor of GCP, the online magazine for global competition policy. Currently, Mr. Panner is a partner at Kellogg, Huber, Hansen, Todd, Evans & Figel PLLC, located in Washington, D.C.

 

Carter G. Phillips

Carter G. PhillipsMr. Phillips received his B.A. from The Ohio State University in 1973, followed by an M.A. from Northwestern University in 1975. He graduated with his J.D. from Northwestern University School of Law in 1977 and then clerked for both Judge Robert Sprecher of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit and Chief Justice Warren E. Burger of the U.S. Supreme Court. Mr. Phillips' practice focuses on appellate advocacy, and he has argued dozens of appeals in federal and other courts. In particular, he has argued 71 cases before the U.S. Supreme Court, more than any other lawyer currently in private practice. Presently, Mr. Phillips is the Managing Partner of the Washington, D.C., office of Sidley Austin and is a member of the firm's Management Committee.

 

Lawrence Rosenberg

Lawrence RosenbergMr. Rosenberg received his B.A. from Cornell in 1989 and his J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1992. After completing law school, he clerked for Judge Jane R. Roth of the U.S. Court of Appeals, Third Circuit. He subsequently served in the Attorney General's Honor Program as a Trial Attorney for the U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Division. Mr. Rosenberg focuses his practice on appellate advocacy and has argued appeals throughout the country, including more than 20 appeals before the Federal Circuit and numerous matters in the U.S. Supreme Court. Recently, he represented Stanford in Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University v. Roche Molecular Systems, argued before the U.S. Supreme Court in February. Mr. Rosenberg is a co-chair of the Trial Practice Committee of the American Bar Association's Litigation Section and principal author of a variety of publications involving appellate advocacy and trial practice. Currently, he is a partner at Jones Day.

 

Eric J. Schwartz

Eric J. SchwartzMr. Schwartz received his B.A. from Johns Hopkins University in 1979 and his J.D. from American University, Washington College of Law in 1984. Mr. Schwartz's career has focused on providing counseling on U.S. and foreign copyright law and related matters. From 1988 to 1994, he was Senior Legal and Policy Advisor for the Register of Copyrights and was Acting General Counsel for the U.S. Copyright Office in 1994. He was involved in crafting a number of copyright amendments, including the Berne Convention Implementation Act (1988) and the GATT Implementation Provisions (1994) that are at the heart of the Golan v. Holder case. He also served as a principal negotiator for the United States in a number of bilateral and multilateral agreements such as the TRIPS agreement, which is also part of the Supreme Court's consideration in Golan. In addition to his practice, Mr. Schwartz is a frequent speaker on copyright issues and is an adjunct professor of copyright law and international copyright law at Georgetown University Law Center. Currently, Mr. Schwartz is a partner at the Washington, D.C., office of Mitchell Silberberg & Knupp LLP.

 

Professor David L. Schwartz

Professor David L. SchwartzProfessor Schwartz received his B.S. in 1992 from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and his J.D. in 1995 from the University of Michigan Law School. Professor Schwartz began practicing as an associate at Jenner & Block in all areas of intellectual property law. From 2000 to 2006, he was a partner at two intellectual property boutique firms before joining the faculty at The John Marshall Law School. In 2009, Professor Schwartz joined the faculty at the Chicago-Kent College of Law, where he remains today. Professor Schwartz's research focuses on empirical studies of patent law, including patent claim construction and the doctrine of equivalents.

 

Paul Wolfson

Paul WolfsonMr. Paul Wolfson is a partner at Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr in Washington, D.C. His practice focuses on appellate litigation, including patent appeals in the U.S. Supreme Court and the Federal Circuit. He has handled many significant intellectual property cases, including Stanford v. Roche and Microsoft v. i4i Limited Partnership, both of which were decided by the Supreme Court in the past Term, as well as eBay, Inc. v. MercExchange and a series of cases for Monsanto in the Federal Circuit. Before joining WilmerHale, Mr. Wolfson worked for eight years in the Solicitor General's Office. He has argued 19 cases in the U.S. Supreme Court.