Required Course Sequence

The required courses are listed below in the normal sequence offered to day division and evening division students; however, the courses and their sequence are subject to change.

DAY DIVISION
(full-time)
DAY DIVISION
(part-time)
EVENING
DIVISION
First Semester 
Contracts
Criminal Law
Torts
Legal Writing 1
First Semester 
Criminal Law
Torts
Legal Writing 1
First Semester 
Criminal Law
Torts
Legal Writing 1
Second Semester 
Civil Procedure
Property
Legislation
Legal Writing 2
Second Semester 
Civil Procedure
Property
Legal Writing 2
Second Semester 
Contracts
Property
Legal Writing 2
Third Semester 
Constitutional Law
Third Semester 
Constitutional Law
Contracts
Third Semester 
Civil Procedure
Legislation
Fourth Semester Fourth Semester 
Legislation
Fourth Semester 
Constitutional Law

 

Additional Requirements

Students must also take the following courses: A course in Professional Responsibility (may be taken any semester after the first year); Legal Writing 3 and Legal Writing 4 (full-time students must take these courses in the second year; part-time students may take these courses in either the second or third year); and a seminar (must be taken after completion of 54 credit hours and after completion of Legal Writing 4).  Please note: Students who are in the bottom 15% of their class at the end of their second year are required to take Intensive Essay Writing Lab in their final Spring semester (students in the remainder of the bottom 25% are strongly encouraged, but not required, to take this class). Taking Intensive Essay Writing Lab satisfies the seminar requirement.

Students beginning in Summer 2016 or later must also complete a total of six credits from an approved list of experiential courses. Most students will already satisfy four of these credits through the required sequence of Legal Writing 3 and Legal Writing 4. However, students who opt for the Legal Writing 4 equivalency should consult the list of approved courses to determine whether the equivalency activity counts toward the experiential requirement. Law Review does not count toward the requirement.