ISLAT Conferences

Defending Our Data: Privacy, Security, and the Wave of Data Breaches

Sponsored by Aon and Edelson, Hosted by Professor Lori Andrews, Professor Richard Warner, and ISLAT

April 7, 2017

Defending Our Data

Data breaches happen at the rate of over two a day and anyone can be a victim. The aggregate social cost is extremely high—not just because of the quantifiable cost to the organizations but also because of the loss of individuals’ privacy, instances of identity theft, and the increased sense of insecurity. Security experts have long explained how to defend better. So why do we still live with a large loss that we have the means to avoid? One reason is that current laws are ineffective. Laws—current and proposed—impose requirements aimed at improving information security. They typically require ‘reasonable’ or ‘appropriate’ security measures, but they provide little or no further guidance. The unending wave of data breaches reveals the inadequacy of the current legal regimes.

 

Beyond Bitcoin: Privacy, Money, Crime and a Better Digital Currency

Hosted by the National Aten Coin Foundation and the Chicago-Kent College of Law

May 27, 2016

Beyond Bitcoin

The Bitcoin competitor Aten Coin describes itself as “the next generation digital currency that utilizes proprietary techniques to verify ownership of coin holders, monitor secured transactions, identify senders and receivers, maintain transparency over record-keeping process, protect coins from theft.” What Aten Coin offers is good for controlling money laundering, but can raise concerns about privacy. The conflict reflects the dual nature of financial regulation. Anti-money-laundering and counter-terrorism law require identifying parties in financial transactions and filing reports on suspicious activity, but privacy regulations restrict the disclosure of personally identifying information.

 

Exposed: Privacy, Security, and the Smart City

November 6, 2015

Exposed

This one-day conference focused on the privacy issues created by the ubiquitous surveillance of smart cities. Chicago is leading the way in becoming a “smart” city, a city that tracks traffic, movement, energy use, cell phones and the like to run more efficiently. Privacy is the price. To live in the smart city is to live exposed. The conference addressed such questions as: What will the exposed life be like? How can we find a balance between privacy rights and the benefits of massive data collection? What control should we have over our information? What roles should technology and the law play in protecting our privacy in the smart city?

 

Health on the Go: Medical Apps, Privacy & Liability

April 4, 2014

Five hundred million people will use a health app by 2015 and the use of health apps will increase by 25% yearly. But what are the privacy and legal implications of Health on the Go?
 

 Medical Apps, Privacy & Liability
Image Credit: Cynthia Sun

The digital world presents new opportunities to improve your health. It's now possible for your every movement, every intonation in your voice, every phone call you dial or receive, and every website you visit to be tracked, documented and analyzed to create your health profile. From maximizing your personal health and identifying public health trends to fueling a new sector of the economy, health information from apps, social networks and games is shaping our lives. And as our digital health data grow, the need to address the legal, medical and social implications becomes increasingly important.

On Friday, April 4, IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law in partnership with UIC School of Public Health brought together medical app developers, lawyers, regulators and health care professionals to discuss privacy and policy considerations for a public increasingly dependent on "Health on the Go." The conference discussed the laws and regulations dealing with the collection and use of health information outside the health care system. It also addressed current federal and state investigations into data aggregation and medical apps. 

No Secrets: Journalism in the Age of Surveillance

February 27, 2014

The Media Consortium and IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law sponsored a full-day conference to discuss journalism in the context of social media, NSA surveillance, and technology. This conference joined informational sessions with hands-on training about encryption and other techniques that reporters and activists can use to protect their sources. Lori Andrews, the director of ISLAT, presented "More that a Face: What Social Media Knows About You." Visit the ISLAT blog, On the Edges of Science and Law, for a recap of the conference. 

Under Watchful Eyes: The Technologies that Track

October 5, 2012

Watchful Eyes
Image Credit: Cynthia Sun

Presented in partnership with the Center for Information, Society and Policy, the "Under Watchful Eyes: The Technologies that Track" Conference focused on location tracking technologies and the benefits and concerns these technologies create.  During the conference, noted speakers analyzed how decisions about the balance between privacy concerns and the benefits of information processing created by these tracking technologies should be made, examined what control we currently have over our information, and discussed the extent to which we can use technology and law to gain greater control in the future. 

Among the speakers were Professor Lori Andrews (Director of the Institute for Science, Law and Technology and Distinguished Professor of Law at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law), Jeff Chester (Executive Director of The Center for Digital Democracy), Theodore Claypoole (Senior Member at Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice), Caitlin Cottrill (Postdoctoral Associate at Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology), Frank Douma (Research Fellow and Associate Director of the Humphrey School of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota), Ret. Major General Charles Dunlap (Executive Director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security and Professor of the Practice of Law at Duke University School of Law), Professor Nancy S. Kim (Professor at California Western School of Law), David Leonard (Journalist and Artist), Professor Jeffrey Rosen (Professor of Law at The George Washington University and Legal Affairs Editor of The New Republic), Robert Sloan (Professor and Department Head of the Department of Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Chicago), Professor Piyushimita Thakuriah (Associate Professor of the Department of Urban Planning and Policy at the University of Illinois at Chicago), Professor Jennifer Urban (Director of the Samuelson Law, Technology & Public Policy Clinic and Assistant Clinical Professor of Law at the University of California, Berkeley), and Professor Richard Warner (Professor of Law and Faculty Director of the Center for Law and Computers at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law).

Conference on Internet Privacy, Social Networks and Data Aggregation

March 23, 2012

ShhThe Institute for Science, Law and Technology and the Center for Information, Society and Policy presented the "Internet Privacy, Social Networks and Data Aggregation" Conference that featured experts in technology, legal, computer science, and information privacy fields as they discussed the internet privacy concerns created by the rise of social networks.   As data aggregation companies continue to gather information about us found online, the speakers at this conference proposed the best ways for consumers, companies, regulators and courts to protect individual privacy.

These leaders included, Professor Lori Andrews (Director of the Institute for Science, Law and Technology and Distinguished Professor of Law at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law), Justin Brookman (Director of the Center for Democracy & Technology's Project on Consumer Privacy), Jay Edelson (Founder and Managing Partner of Edelson McGuire, LLC), Professor Harry Lewis (Gordon McKay Professor of Computer Science in the School of Engineering and Applied Science at Harvard University), Professor Jon Peha (Professor in the Department of Engineering and Public Policy and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University), Professoor Henry H. Perritt, Jr. (Professor of Law at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law), Professor Robert Sloan (Professor and Department Head of the Department of Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Chicago), Christopher Soghoian (Open Society Fellow at the Open Society Foundations and Former In-house Technologist at the Federal Trade Commission), and Professor Richard Warner (Professor of Law at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law).

Who Owns Your Body?  Legal and Social Issues in Michael Crichton's NEXT

May 21, 2007

Who Owns Your Body?  Legal and Social Issues in Michael Crichton's NEXTWith Michael Crichton-world renowned, award winning author of 20 books including Jurassic Park, State of Fear, the Andromeda Strain, and NEXT-as the featured speaker, the Institute for Science, Law and Technology invited experts in their field to come to IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law to discuss how the current battles in the courts and Congress will and have determined who owns your body.  During the conference, speakers discussed the legal status of and disputes over research on body tissue (such as the patenting of human genes) and discussed the potential policy, legislative and/or other legal solutions to this dilemma. 

Along with Michael Crichton, the other invited speakers were, Professor Lori Andrews (Director of the Institute for Science, Law and Technology and Distinguished Professor of Law at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law), the Honorable Armand Arabian (Former member of the Supreme Court of California), Timothy Caulfield (Research Director of Health Law at the University of Alberta), Dr. John M. Conley (William Rand Kenan, Jr. Professor of Law at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill), Michele Goodwin (Wicklander Chair in Ethics and Professor of Law at DePaul College of Law), Debra Harry (Executive Director of The Indigenous People's Council on Biocolonialism), Dr. Stephen Hilgartner (Associate Professor in the Department of Science and Technology Studies at Cornell University and Chair of the Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues committee of the Cornell Genomics Initiative), and Seth Shulman (Journalist and Author).